Sunday, March 30, 2014

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There are those who will say that insisting on gender-neutral books and toys for children is a bizarre experiment in social engineering by radical lefties and paranoid “femininazis” who won’t allow boys to be boys, and girls to be girls. (Because, by the way, seeking equality of rights and opportunities was a key plank of Nazi ideology, was it?) But the “experiment” is nothing new. When I grew up in the 1970s, and when my parents grew up in the 1950s, brothers and sisters shared the same toys, books and games, which came in many more colours than just pink and blue, and there was no obvious disintegration of society as a result. Publishers and toy companies like to say that they are offering parents more “choice” these days by billing some of their products as just for boys and others as just for girls. What they’re actually doing, by convincing children that boys and girls can’t play with each other’s stuff, is forcing parents to buy twice as much stuff. Gender-specific books demean all our children. So the Independent on Sunday will no longer review anything marketed to exclude either sex - Comment - Voices - The Independent (via becauseiamawoman)
Saturday, March 29, 2014
femfreq:

"Patriarchy Game" by Madison Reid Graphic Design & Illustration

cornerof5thandvermouth:

i think what people don’t realize is that people in activist spaces don’t actually like being angry all the time

we want to be able to go about our day without constantly being on guard for casual abuse, degradation, and shitty behavior hurled our way

we’re not angry at you because we think you’re unconditionally terrible people

we’re angry because we fully believe that you can do better

What is interesting, is that the Frida Kahlo venerated by American feminists is a very different Frida Kahlo to the one people learn about in Mexico, in the Chicano community. In her country, she is recognized as an important artist and a key figure in revolutionary politics of early 20th century Mexico. Her communist affiliations are made very clear. Her relationship with Trotsky is underscored. All her political activities with Diego Rivera are constantly emphasized. The connection between her art and her politics is always made. When Chicana artists became interested in Frida Kahlo in the ‘70s and started organizing homages, they made the connection between her artistic project and theirs because they too were searching for an aesthetic compliment to a political view that was radical and emancipatory. But when the Euro-American feminists latch onto Frida Kahlo in the early ‘80s and when the American mainstream caught on to her, she was transformed into a figure of suffering. I am very critical of that form of appropriation.

Coco Fusco on her Amerindians piece from 1992 with Guillermo Gómez-Peña (via tofunkey)

IMPORTANT

(via highlyfunctioningintrovert)

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